National and Regional School IPM Priorities (.xls)

National School IPM 2014 Priorities

Management Priorities

  • Coordination with state agencies (e.g., posters for schools, packets for teachers).
    Develop IPM decision-making tools, e.g., a decision tree with pest-specific steps and/or a pest solution center to help schools prioritize needs within budgetary constraints, facility/work order management systems such as School Dude, MUNIS, i-PEST, IPM Calculator.
  • Identify and piggyback with ongoing environmental health efforts and coordinate with partners in promoting IPM to help schools (including child care facilities) to meet health, high performance and safety, economic, and energy efficiency goals, e.g.,  Environmental Management System, engage environmental health and safety professionals by creating awareness of the need and effective methodology for success, connect school IPM projects with broader pollution prevention initiatives at school district, state and national level.
  • Track adoption of IPM practices in schools and disseminate economic, environmental and/or health impacts of IPM, e.g., schools perform annual self-assessments, case studies, research data, utilize state report cards to help determine training needs and goals.
  • Promote inclusion of IPM in certification standards, e.g., USGBC, Green Seal.
  • Recognize schools, organizations and pest management providers for practicing verifiable, high-level IPM and provide incentives, e.g., IPM STAR, recognition, positive publicity, reduced liability and insurance, using clear and comprehensive standards.
  • Establish appropriately trained IPM coordinators in school systems to oversee day-to-day implementation of IPM policies and programs.
  • Provide funding for school assessments including active partimkcipation by local actors (e.g. Extension, public health agencies) to prioritize needed improvements in individual school systems (e.g., IPM STAR).
  • Increase funding for management, coordination, education, research and implementation, e.g., outreach to non-traditional funders for IPM STAR, establish a travel fund to support interstate travel for school IPM coordinator and applicators.
  • Develop national school IPM coalition of stakeholder organizations to coordinate implementation of proven approaches nationwide.
  • Create job-specific IPM Guidelines for roles within schools (e.g. athletic field managers, custodians, maintenance staff, principals, etc).
  • Identify, educate and activate appropriate school-related organizations to embed IPM into the organizational culture, including ongoing continuing education opportunities for members.
  • Establish a go-to-person for assistance in each state.
  • Establish a relationship with IPM Voice (allow for advocacy). Send priority list to IPM voice so they can advocate.
  • Establish demonstration schools in each state, including states that have not had pilots in the past and underserved school districts.
  • Increase recognition/awareness of IPM.
  • Develop realistic goals for high level IPM in schools by 2015.

Educational Priorities

  • Develop and utilize educational methods to provide education and hands-on training for custodial, maintenance, kitchen and grounds staff, school nurses, facility directors, administrators, teachers and IPM coordinators in rural, suburban and urban settings.
  • Improve superintendents, principals and teacher pre-service training courses and develop curricula for training Extension, state legislators and other change agents, e.g., promote education on how to read a pesticide label.
  • Provide training for IPM coordinators to improve effectiveness in their role.
    Create multi-state coordinated train the trainer programs on School IPM, e.g., resources for peer-to-peer training.
  • Provide IPM and health information to teachers, support staff, department of education, parents and administrators, e.g., common display content that allows each state to use their own logos.
  • Educate policy makers about the needs and benefits of IPM in terms of dollars, health, environmental and academic performance, e.g., use case studies describing how school IPM programs can be initiated and sustained.
  • Partner with pest management professionals and organizations to create and implement effective, economical IPM service relationships, e.g., provide pest control service providers with sample vendor packet with sample contact/sample service tickets.
  • Implement/promote K-12 curriculum-based education and encourage inclusion of IPM in education standards. Promote IPM Service Learning, e.g., using school buildings/grounds and community settings.
  • Promote inclusion of IPM lessons into teacher education programs at universities and develop web-based distance education through extension.
  • Create pesticide education program at national level to target schools.
  • Outreach to schools and the public about turf management options that are sustainable, organic, and/or use IPM management practices.
  • Coordinate and piggyback education efforts with parallel efforts, e.g., ‘Tools for School’s type programs, e.g., participate in trade shows/health expos, etc.
  • Educate school IPM coordinators/facilities director on how to interpret service tickets/invoices from pest control providers, e.g., develop a model IPM service resource for use in promoting easily understood and comprehensive service.
  • Create best management practice for schools to use with vendors of pest management services, design and construction services, custodial services, food and drink product service providers, etc.
  • Create basic awareness and understanding of the concept of IPM (and the acronym) among mass media which can be used to educate the general public about IPM, e.g., develop bed bug information in ‘lay’ language, create fact sheet marketing IPM and develop organizational chart of IPM entities.
  • Market IPM in conjunction with other environmental improvements.
  • Allow participants input early in the process when implementing demonstrations or coalitions.
  • Revisit working group marketing and outreach strategies, e.g., develop learning labs which travel from school to school covering specific pest topics.
  • Create Spanish language materials.
  • Create more interactive/downloadable based training materials, e.g., develop a YouTube subcommittee to organize production with other workgroups to develop content topics and scripts and create IPM coordinator video testimonials.
  • Promote IPM STAR evaluator training.

Research Priorities

  • Identify effective least-risk products and tools to manage pests and measure IPM continual improvement. Compile data/information on effects of pesticides and pests on children’s health, (asthma, allergies, absenteeism, grades, ADHA,), academic performance and safety factors, e.g., IPM PRIME for schools.
  • Research the impact pest management practices have on indoor and outdoor school environmental health, e.g., school well water, school gardens and use of adjacent properties.
  • Evaluate building design, construction, renovation, and maintenance criteria, e.g., green buildings, LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design), LEED for Schools EB (Existing Buildings) and CHPS.
  • Research effectiveness of pesticides/pest treatments, e.g., turf management options (low impact product identification), organic 25b, reduced-risk options, home remedies, stinging insect IPM management, microbial drain cleaners, bed bug IPM and head lice treatment options.
  • Compile, update, and evaluate state requirements and resources for school IPM.
  • Potential cross-over benefits of school IPM, e.g., impact school IPM has on improving the greater community.
  • Develop analysis tools and conduct in-depth inspections of schools to determine what pest management practices are really being used.
  • Research and evaluate outreach methods to determine most effective methods of school/community audiences, e.g., identification of entry points for implementation of IPM and study of sociological factors affecting adoption of IPM. Conduct a comparative analysis of the effectiveness of different types of change agents such as Extension and advocacy group parents have on IPM adoption.
  • Efficacy of training methods for school-district based IPM coordinators, custodians and teachers.
  • Research the cost of IPM, including: implementation and education versus conventional pest management, conduct a cost analysis for misapplication of pesticides (indoor and outdoor), calculate the cost savings of exclusion practices, e.g., ancillary benefits of IPM and conduct a comparative analysis of the cost of pest control in-house versus contracted out (all costs).
  • Research the geographic distribution of pest species and range of expansion.
  • Research the most effective methods for third-party assessment of the quality of services provided to schools by pest management professionals.
  • Raise awareness of and attitudes towards IPM among school community members through the assessment of their satisfaction with IPM, e.g., success stories of IPM adoption.
  • Research corporate avenues for financial support of high level IPM in schools, e.g., cleaning and supply companies.
  • Research the use of mosquito repellent at home with student/employee versus on school property

Regulatory Priorities

  • Identify and promote interagency cooperation among regulatory, environmental, health, insurance, education, State and Federal, Cooperative Extension and other agencies.
  • Establish IPM policies in school systems to institutionalize the commitment to IPM, e.g., establish and share Parent /Teacher Association (PTA) school IPM models/restrictions; incorporate IPM into school wellness legislation; state school board adoption of IPM policy.
  • Implement and enforce existing IPM laws and policies (regarding verifiable standards) at the highest level of economic and regulatory accountability.
  • Create and mandate minimum standards for school IPM at federal level, e.g., established through high level IPM training/licensing for pest management professionals.
  • Develop organizations and strategies for influencing change that will result in state Department of Education,  Health and Safety regulations and policies that call for IPM, e.g., seek state legislator champion to present successful legislation at NCSL annual conference.
  • Establish or use existing diverse local stakeholder committees to advocate for policies and procedures that implement proven IPM strategies and practices, e.g., develop and disseminate a protocol for grassroots implementation to increase effectiveness of local advocates, partner with National Pest Management Association, Beyond.
  • Advocate for change at federal level, e.g., SEPA: School Environmental Protection Act, NCLB: No Child Left Behind, HHPS Act.
  • Identify opportunities for improving regulations and regulatory and legislative processes to improve IPM adoption, e.g., US Senate and House committees that work on school legislation at the federal level.
  • Quantify costs to regulatory agencies for enforcement of school IPM regulations and advocate for funds, e.g., increase funding for the enforcement of existing regulations including compliance by commercial pest management professionals and other businesses providing services to schools, and for evaluating pesticides-use records submitted to state-lead agencies in states with mandates reporting for compliance.
  • Review pesticide labels for risks to children in school/childcare setting.
  • Establish minimum students’ rights for environmental health standards in schools and include students and teachers in OSHA-like protections.
  • Develop a model compliance agreement for use by state lead agencies with violators of states pesticides and/or school IPM regulations, i.e., regulations with “teeth”.
  • Fund consultant services for IPM compliance assistance to provide schools with access to experts who can identify opportunities for improvements.
  • Work to incorporate IPM strategies into building codes.

North Central Region School IPM Working Group Priorities

Management

  • Establish demonstration schools in each state, including states that have not had pilots in the past
  • Increase recognition/awareness of IPM
  • Develop realistic goals in our states for high level IPM in schools by 2015
  • Obtain resources (web site, money)
  • Establish sustainable coalitions in every state
    Develop and make available easy to use, low cost reporting and record keeping for IPM in schools (e.g. iPest Manager)
  • 1.0 full-time equivalent (FTE) per state devoted to school/daycare Integrated Pest Management (IPM)
  • Provide schools with economic incentives, such as reduced liability and insurance
  • Work with Pest Management Providers to create and implement effective business models
  • Utilize state report cards to help determine training needs and goals
  • Create model state IPM law
  • Define an acceptable baseline for high level IPM
  • Schools assess IPM by doing annual self-assessments of IPM programs by district
  • Record accomplishments, milestones, evaluations
  • Go-to person for assistance

Regulatory

  • State Department of Education, health and safety regulations and policies that call for IPM
  • Mandate IPM training or license for all who service schools
  • State school board adoption of IPM policy
  • Establish and share Parent-Teacher Association (PTA) school IPM models/restrictions
  • State legislation
  • Seek state legislator champion to present successful legislation at NCSL annual conference.
  • School Environment Protection Act – partner with National Pest Management Association and Beyond Pesticides to lobby Congress

Education

  • Provide advanced training for pest management professionals (PMPs)
  • Educate policy-makers at district, state and federal levels
  • Provide advanced training for in-school IPM coordinators
  • Use the media to educate the general public about IPM
  • Provide training for change agents on demonstrations, forming sustainable coalitions, understanding terminology, motivating key people
  • Provide basic training for change agents on how to diffuse IPM in schools
  • Market IPM in conjunction with other environmental improvements
  • Allow participants’ input early in the process when implementing demonstrations or coalitions
  • Revisit working group marketing and outreach strategies

Research

  • IPM adoption cost/benefit
  • Evaluation of health hazards of pest and pesticides
  • Independent efficacy data on turf options, organic 25b, reduced-risk options, home remedies, stinging insects
  • Research corporate avenues for financial support of high level IPM in schools, e.g. cleaning and supply companies
  • School IPM adoption rates including cost/benefit of school IPM
  • Efficacy of training methods for school-district based IPM coordinators
  • Efficacy of options for head lice, e.g. combs, shampoo

Northeastern School IPM Working Group Priorities

Education/Outreach

  • Develop and utilize educational methods appropriate for the audience (for example for
    facilities directors, administrators, teachers, rural, suburban and urban audiences) and
    conduct outreach to all stakeholder groups (teachers, athletic managers and coaches,
    staff, students, facilities managers, administration, policy makers, regulators, vendors,
    building owners, occupants, community members, families).
  • Implement/promote K-12 curriculum-based education. Promote IPM Service Learning for example using school buildings/grounds and community settings. Promote inclusion of IPM in education standards.
  • Educate policy makers about the needs and benefits of IPM in terms of dollars, health,
    environment and academic performance. Advocate for funds for IPM education.
  • Educate policy makers about the needs and benefits of IPM in terms of dollars, health,
    environment and academic performance. Advocate for funds for IPM education.
  • Outreach to schools and the public about turf management options that are sustainable, organic, and/or use IPM management practices.
  • Coordinate and piggyback education efforts with parallel efforts (ie ‘Tools for Schools’
    type programs).
  • Conduct pilot demonstrations in schools in the northeast region.
  • Work with vendors of pest management, custodial services and supplies and other
    services to provide IPM education, supplies and service.
  • Educate school IPM coordinators/facilities director on how to interpret service
    tickets/invoices from pest control providers. Develop model IPM service records for use
    in promoting easily understood and comprehensive service records including nonpesticide solutions.
  • Improve linkages between regulatory agencies and Cooperative Extension.
    Promote inclusion of IPM lessons into teacher education programs at universities.

Research

  • Identify efficacious least-risk products and tools to manage pests.
  • Compile data/information on effects of pesticides and pests on children’s health and academic indicators. performance, and the influence of IPM in addressing health and performance
  • Evaluate efficacy and risk/benefits of EPA-exempt (25b) products.
  • Evaluate building design, construction, renovation, and maintenance criteria (such as
    ‘green buildings’, LEED(Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design), LEED for
    Schools EB (Existing Buildings), CHPS (Coalition of High Performing Schools),
    EPA(Environmental Protection Agency) Tools for Schools (Indoor Air Quality),
    HealthySEAT (School Environmental Assessment Tool), sports fields and landscape
    design criteria, etc) for presence of IPM principles and practices and rates of adoption
    and provide recommendations for inclusion of IPM principles/tactics in these criteria.
  • Research and evaluate outreach methods to determine most effective methods for
    school/community audiences.
  • Develop analysis tools and conduct in-depth inspections of schools to determine what
    pest management practices are really being used.
  • Research on the impact of pest management on indoor and outdoor school
    environmental health (eg school’s well water, school gardens, use on adjacent
    properties).
  • Research on effective teaching methods to teach students and teachers about IPM.
  • Compile, update, and evaluate state requirements and resources for school IPM.

Regulatory

  • Enforce existing IPM laws and policies, at the level of fiduciary and regulatory
    accountability, and establish these laws and policies where none exist.
  • Review Pesticide Safety Education core standards and make recommendations to
    include IPM principles and practices.
  • Identify and promote interagency cooperation among regulatory, environmental, health, insurance, education, and other agencies
  • Encourage states to adopt certification programs for indoor and outdoor school IPM
    providers
  • Evaluate regulatory approaches to use of EPA exempt (25b) products and determine if
    these products are accessible for use by schools under existing state and federal
    regulations.
  • Incorporate IPM into school wellness legislation
  • Advocate for funds for enforcement of pesticide regulations
  • Quantify costs to regulatory agencies for enforcement of school IPM regulations.
  • Include students and teachers in OSHA-like protections
  • Advocate for change at federal level (SEPA: School Environmental Protection Act,
    NCLB: No Child Left Behind, HHPS Act).

Management

  • Identify and piggyback with ongoing environmental health efforts and coordinate with
    partners in promoting IPM to help schools (including child care facilities) to meet health, high performance and safety,economic, and energy efficiency goals.
  • Assist schools in prioritizing major pest management needs, especially with current
    budgetary constraints.
  • At school district and/or local school level, establish or use existing diverse local
    stakeholder committees to advocate for policies and procedures that implement proven IPM strategies and practices
  • Track adoption of IPM practices in schools and disseminate economic, environmental
    and/or health impacts of IPM (e.g. case studies, research data).
  • Form a stakeholder coalition to advocate for establishment of IPM laws and policies
    where none exist.
  • Implement and enforce existing laws and policies at the highest level of economic and
    regulatory accountability.
  • Recognize schools, organizations and pest management providers that practice
    verifiable high level IPM.

Southern Region School IPM Working Group Priorities

Education

  • IPM Coordinator video testimonials
  • YouTube Videos (For training, for education to school personnel)
  • Financial resources fro IPM Star hopefuls
  • Training for Extension Agents (ground level info)
  • Training IPM for local PMPs
  • Degree/certification for IPM coordinators
  • Spanish Language materials
  • More interactive/downloadable based training materials
  • IPM Star Evaluator Training
  • Resources for awareness/outreach for Superintendents and School Board members
  • More training power points for schools to use (i.e. Coordinator to use to train school staff at various levels)
  • Web based distance education thru extension
  • Bed bug information for teachers, parents, nurses in “lay” language
  • Resources for peer to peer training
  • Get parents, school and community groups more involved
  • School based curriculum – lesson plans for kids (4H, FFA, etc.)
  • Fact sheet – one pager – marketing IPM
  • Engagement with partner groups (asthma coalitions, school nurses, facility managers, etc.)
  • Info for IPM in athletic areas by region (low impact herbicides, etc.)
  • Learning lab (travel to schools) for training on specific pests, etc.
  • Organizational chart of IPM entities
  • Speaker resources (bureau) by region (i.e. driving distance, etc.)
  • Participation in trade shows/health expos, etc.
  • Common Display Content (allow each state to use own logos)

Research

  • Pesticide efficacy in schools (i.e. EPA 25b products, exempt products)
  • Cost of pest control in-house vs. contracted out (all costs)
  • Impacts on building design, construction process including pest proofing, new and remodel school projects
  • Efficacy of IPM tactics in schools (i.e. mechanical, exclusion, etc.)
  • Cost savings using IPM (direct and indirect)
  • Cost savings of exclusion practices (ancillary benefits of IPM)
  • Turf IPM for schools – using low impact products and what are they
  • Improvement in Average Daily Attendance (ADA) due to IPM implementation
  • Evaluation of efficacy of microbial drain cleaners – do they work, do they control pests
  • Sociological factors affecting adoption of IPM (getting to the behavior change)
  • Impacts on indoor air quality using IPM
  • Health benefits of IPM (asthma, allergies, other)
  • Pest and pesticide affects on ADHD
  • Cleaning (for custodians and teachers) best practices
  • Meta data analysis of safety factors (e.g., IPM PRIME for schools)
  • Use of mosquito repellent at home with student/employee vs. on school property
  • Success stories of IPM adoption (not from TX)
  • Cost of misapplication of pesticides (indoor and out)

Regulatory

  • Special certification for IPM applicators at schools
  • Regulations with “teeth”
  • Complete overhaul of signal words on label (ability to easily ID low impact or reduced risk pesticides by EPA)
  • Mandatory School IPM Law – Model development of a law
  • Elimination of 25b products by EPA
  • Database of low impact pesticides by EPA – using searchable terms based on MSDS and label information – define low impact
  • Required license for applications at schools (Only licensed applicators can make any pesticide application, not under supervision)
  • Proper description of IPM in Laws
  • Communication and coordinator among regulatory agencies (Dept. Health, Dept of Ed, Water Quality, etc.) State and Federal
  • IPM Grading Scale
  • Qualification/certification of IPM coordinators
  • Send priority list to IPM Voice (so they can advocate)
  • Required continuing education for PMPs on IPM
  • Required continuing education for school nurses on IPM
  • Train the trainer qualification program
  • Proactive compliance assistance

Management – 5 Year Goals

  • Awareness for potential partners
  • Collaborate on Development of Training Materials
  • Create informational opportunities for stakeholders
  • Develop marketing tagline for IPM Star (IPM is hard to “comprehend”
  • Develop the school IPM Training Manual to be used in the region
  • Establish a relationship with IPM Voice (allow for advocacy)
  • Establish a travel fund to support interstate travel for school IPM coordinators and applicators
  • Expand expertise into public health, wildlife, school officials, medical professionals
  • Guest Participants on Workgroup phone Conferences
  • Incentives for IPM Adoption through some type of monetary, training or supplies for schools
  • IPM Star School in Every State (at least one) – serve as mentors to others
  • Multi-state coordinated train the trainer programs on school IPM
  • Outreach to non-traditional funders for IPM Star
  • Strengthen support for struggling states
    YouTube Video – subcommittee to organize production with other workgroups to develop content topics and scrip’s
  • YouTube Video Development – subcommittee

Western School IPM Working Group Priorities

Research

  • Identify effective least-risk products and tools to manage pests and measure IPM continual improvement.
  • Research the impact pest management practices have on indoor and outdoor home/school/childcare environmental health, e.g., school well water, school gardens and use of adjacent properties.
  • Compile data/information on effects of pesticides and pests on children’s health, (asthma, allergies, absenteeism, grades, ADHA,), academic performance and safety factors, e.g., IPM PRIME for schools.
  • Evaluate outreach methods to determine most effective ways of influencing sensitive environment community audiences, e.g., identification of entry points for implementation of IPM and study of sociological factors affecting adoption of IPM. Conduct a comparative analysis of the effectiveness of different types of change agents such as Extension and advocacy group parents have on IPM adoption.
  • Evaluate building design, construction, renovation, and maintenance criteria, e.g., green buildings, LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design), LEED for Schools EB (Existing Buildings) and CHPS.
  • Research effectiveness of pesticides/pest treatments, e.g., turf management options (low impact product identification), organic 25b, reduced-risk options, home remedies, stinging insect IPM management, microbial drain cleaners, bed bug IPM and head lice treatment options.
  • Investigate rodenticide use changes pre and post EPA rodenticide law update.
  • Investigate commensal rodents for pathogen carrying capacity and assess food-borne illness connections.
  • Compile, update, and evaluate state requirements and resources for school/childcare IPM.
  • Potential cross-over benefits of school IPM, e.g., impact school IPM has on improving the greater community.

 

Management

  • Develop guidance documents and materials for school/childcare staff managing arbovirus vectors on-site.
  • Develop sustainable state and federal funding for statewide IPM Extension programs to deal with “routine”/“non-novel” ongoing needs that are not funded by grants (e.g. annual IPM coordinator training, maintenance of low-impact pesticide lists, and updating of educational materials).
  • Develop IPM decision-making tools, e.g., a decision tree with pest-specific steps and/or a pest solution center to help sensitive environments prioritize needs within budgetary constraints, facility/work order management systems such as School Dude, MUNIS, i-PEST, IPM Calculator.
  • Establish demonstration schools/childcare facilities in each state, including states that have not had pilots in the past and underserved school districts.
  • Track adoption of IPM practices in schools/childcare facilities and disseminate economic, environmental and/or health impacts of IPM, e.g., schools perform annual self-assessments, case studies, research data, utilize state report cards to help determine training needs and goals.
  • Recognize schools/childcare facilities, organizations and pest management providers for practicing verifiable, high-level IPM and provide incentives, e.g., IPM STAR, recognition, positive publicity, reduced liability and insurance, using clear and comprehensive standards.
  • Identify, educate and activate appropriate school-related organizations to embed IPM into the organizational culture, including ongoing continuing education opportunities for members.
  • Coordination with state agencies (e.g., posters for schools, packets for teachers).
  • Identify and piggyback with ongoing environmental health efforts and coordinate with partners in promoting IPM to help schools (including child care facilities) to meet health, high performance and safety, economic, and energy efficiency goals, e.g., Environmental Management System, engage environmental health and safety professionals by creating awareness of the need and effective methodology for success, connect school IPM projects with broader pollution prevention initiatives at school district, state and national level.
  • Promote greater inclusion of IPM in certification standards, e.g., USGBC, Green Seal.

 

Education/Outreach

  • Educate policy makers about the needs and benefits of IPM in terms of dollars, health, environmental and academic performance, e.g., use case studies describing how sensitive environment IPM programs can be initiated and sustained.
  • Create best management practice for schools/childcare facilities to use with vendors of pest management services, design and construction services, custodial services, food and drink product service providers, etc.
  • Promote education on how to read a pesticide label to school IPM audiences, e.g., teachers, custodial, etc.
  • Create Spanish language materials.
  • Promote vector awareness in school community.
  • Provide IPM and health information to school/childcare teachers, support staff, department of education, parents and administrators, e.g., common display content that allows each state to use their own logos.
  • Develop and utilize educational methods to provide education and hands-on training for school/childcare/medical facility custodial, maintenance, kitchen and grounds staff, school nurses, facility directors, administrators, teachers and IPM coordinators in rural, suburban and urban settings.
  • On-site assessment of and training on pesticide storage facilities and disposal practices.
  • Education and training of Environmental Health Specialists (i.e. health inspectors) that inspect school kitchens, concession stands and student stores.
  • Educate on commensal rodents and rodenticide laws.
  • Educate on food-safety issues relevant to school kitchens and food service areas.
  • On-site assessments of and training on irrigation audits.

 

Regulatory

  • Work to incorporate IPM strategies into building codes.
  • Generate unbiased product efficacy data on commensal rodent and German cockroach management products (both monitoring and control, chemical and non-chemical).
  • Identify and promote interagency cooperation among regulatory, environmental, health, insurance, education, State and Federal, Cooperative Extension and other agencies.
  • Establish IPM policies in school systems to institutionalize the commitment to IPM, e.g., establish and share Parent /Teacher Association (PTA) school IPM models/restrictions; incorporate IPM into school wellness legislation; state school board adoption of IPM policy.
  • Create and mandate minimum standards for school IPM at federal level, e.g., established through high level IPM training/licensing for pest management professionals.
  • Implement and enforce existing IPM laws and policies (regarding verifiable standards) at the highest level of economic and regulatory accountability.
  • Identify opportunities for improving regulations and regulatory and legislative processes to improve IPM adoption, e.g., US Senate and House committees that work on school legislation at the federal level.
  • Develop organizations and strategies for influencing change that will result in state Department of Education, Health and Safety regulations and policies that call for IPM, e.g., seek state legislator champion to present successful legislation at NCSL annual conference.
  • Establish or use existing diverse local stakeholder committees to advocate for policies and procedures that implement proven IPM strategies and practices, e.g., develop and disseminate a protocol for grassroots implementation to increase effectiveness of local advocates, partner with National Pest Management Association, Beyond.
  • Establish minimum students’ rights for environmental health standards in schools and include students and teachers in OSHA-like protections.
  • Fund consultant services for IPM compliance assistance to provide schools with access to experts who can identify opportunities for improvements.
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