Turf Cultural Management

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Section 35. Turf Cultural Management
[  ] NOT APPLICABLE (Check here if turf is not present at your school and proceed to Section 53. Vertebrate Pests.) 

Points
Available

Points
Earned

1. At least a rough map is prepared:
a) noting locations of turf areas; 5 _____
b) dividing these into management units/grids; and 5 _____
c) copies of map are updated annually noting soil tests, fertilizer applications and pest and other problems (e.g., erosion, compaction). 10 _____
2. High profile/high traffic turf areas are scouted at least monthly during the growing season for divots, bare areas, insect, disease and weed pests and damage, etc.  20 _____
3. Bonus: Turf is scouted at least every other week during the growing season. 10 _____
4. A serpentine or other regular pattern is used to ensure that all areas of the turf are covered.  10 _____
5. Problem turf areas identified in the IPM Plan are scouted more frequently during critical periods (i.e., around key pest emergence, egglaying, etc.). 5 _____
6. Corrective actions are identified and a timeline is established for implementation.  10 _____
7. Scouting results, corrective actions and evaluation of results are noted legibly in writing and these records are maintained for at least three years. 10 _____
8. Identifying soil compaction is part of regular monitoring and problem areas are corrected. 10 _____
9. Mowing height is set as high as practical to maximize shading and prevent weed growth, and adjusted according to weather conditions, growth rate of the grass and the variety of turf.  10 _____
10. Any one mowing removes 1/3 or less of leaf tissue.  10 _____
11. Mower blades are kept sharp to ensure a clean cut. 10 _____
12. Grass clippings are generally not removed. If wet and clumpy, grass clippings are re-mowed, or removed and composted. 10 _____
13. After mowing, grass clippings are removed from paved areas (e.g., sidewalks, parking areas, road and driveways) and composted or otherwise properly disposed of to avoid movement into sewer systems. 5 _____
14. Thatch accumulation is monitored and corrected if excessive (> 1.25″). 10 _____
15. Soil is tested at least every five years for phosphorus, potassium and pH.  10 _____
16. Fertilizers and other soil amendments are applied according to soil and/or plant foliage test results, not on a routine or regularly scheduled basis (except for nitrogen, which may be applied on a scheduled basis). 10 _____
17. Fertilizers are applied several times (e.g., spring, summer, fall) rather than one single heavy application. 5 _____
18. When fertilizers are applied, they are watered into the soil to reduce wind or rain-induced movement from the site. 5 _____
19. When fertilizers are needed, at least 35% of the total annual nitrogen is in slow-release form to reduce pest flareups due to flushes of nitrogen. 5 _____
20. Bonus: Fertilizers are selected to include those that may promote thatch decomposition (e.g., composted organic materials). 5 _____
If turf moisture requirements are managed effectively without irrigation, score items 19-21 as N/A.
21. Irrigation is scheduled according to need and anticipated weather, and not on a routine or regularly scheduled basis. Athletic fields may be irrigated on a scheduled basis, adjusted for rainfall, to ensure adequate moisture for recovery and growth. 10 _____
22. When irrigation is applied, it is sufficient to wet the entire turf root zone to reduce shallow rooting, but may be split to allow infiltration and avoid runoff. Exceptions are made for specific disease pressure (e.g., summer patch) dictating more frequent and less deep irrigations. 5 _____
23. If moisture-dependent turf diseases are a problem (e.g., pythium, rhizoctonia blight, rusts), irrigation is scheduled to minimize the amount of time grass blades remain wet to reduce opportunities for disease development (i.e., turf is dry before nightfall) 5 _____
24. Bare soil patches in turf areas are addressed promptly by correcting the underlying cause (e.g., excessive traffic, inappropriate seed mix, poor drainage) before reseeding. 5 _____
25. When renovating, planting new turf or overseeding, seed mixes are selected to address site-specific growing conditions (e.g., cool vs. warm-season, endophyte enhancements, tolerance to key pests, tolerant to levels of shading and annual rainfall, etc.). Non-essential traffic on athletic fields (e.g., band, phys ed) is adjusted as needed to allow repair. 5 _____
26. Soil compaction is minimized by:
a) rotating mowing patterns; 5 _____
b) using flotation tires on equipment; 5 _____
c) periodic topdressing and/or aeration; and/or 5 _____
d) restricting foot and equipment traffic when soil is overly wet due to irrigation or heavy rain. 5 _____
27. Core cultivation uses hollow tines at least 3″ long and is scheduled when soil moisture is adequate to pull cores but dry enough to avoid ruts and compaction from equipment. Core cultivators are of the type that do not add to compaction. If turf aeration, infiltration and compaction are managed adequately without core aeration, score as N/A.  5 _____
28. Turf aeration is timed to avoid periods when heavy seeding weeds (e.g., crabgrass, dandelions) are germinating or setting seeds. 5 _____
29. Topdressing material is free from glass, rocks or other debris and matches the soil type of the root zone as closely as possible. If topdressing is not used, score as N/A. 5 _____
30. Bonus: If sand topdressing is used, particle size distribution is close to that specified for U.S. Golf Association putting greens. 5 _____

Total Points Available for Turf Cultural Management
Total Points Not Applicable
Total Points Earned for Turf Cultural Management

240

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Turf Disease & Nematode Pest Management

[  ] NOT APPLICABLE (Check here if turf disease and nematode pests are not a problem requiring action at your school and proceed to the Section 47. Turf Insect and Mite Management.)

 

Section 36. Dollar Spot
[  ] NOT APPLICABLE (Check here if Dollar Spot is not a problem requiring action at your school, and proceed to the next section.) 

Points
Available

Points
Earned

1. Priority: Action thresholds for Dollar Spot are defined in the IPM Plan and effectively implemented. 20 _____
2. When Dollar Spot problems occur, contributing factors are identified and corrected (e.g., correct nitrogen deficiency, plant resistant varieties). 20 _____
3. Priority: Reduced-Impact or Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for Dollar Spot management. 5 _____
4. Turf maintenance personnel are provided with training at least annually to recognize and report Dollar Spot problems. 10 _____
5. Bonus: Pest Manager can identify Dollar Spot symptoms on sight.  10 _____
6. Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for Dollar Spot. 5

_____

Total Points Available for Dollar Spot Management
Total Points Earned for Dollar Spot Management

60

_____

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Section 37. Fairy Ring
[  ] NOT APPLICABLE (Check here if Fairy Ring is not a problem requiring action at your school and proceed to the next section.) 

Points
Available

Points
Earned

1. Priority: Action thresholds for Fairy Ring are defined in the IPM Plan and effectively implemented. 20 _____
2. Pesticides are ineffective and not used for Fairy Ring. 20 _____
3. When Fairy Ring problems occur, contributing factors are identified and corrected (e.g., remove buried stumps or wood debris, remove excess thatch). 20 _____
4. Priority: Reduced-Impact or Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for Fairy Ring management. 5 _____
5. Turf maintenance personnel are provided with training at least annually to recognize and report Fairy Ring problems. 10 _____
6. Bonus: Pest Manager can identify Fairy Ring symptoms on sight. 10 _____
7. Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for Fairy Ring. 5

_____

Total Points Available for Fairy Ring Management
Total Points Earned for Fairy Ring Management
80


_____

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Section 38. Gray Leafspot
[  ] NOT APPLICABLE (Check here if Gray Leafspot is not a problem requiring action at your school and proceed to the next section.) 

Points
Available

Points
Earned

1. Priority: Action thresholds for Gray Leafspot are defined in the IPM Plan and effectively implemented. 20 _____
2. When Gray Leafspot problems occur, contributing factors are identified and corrected (e.g., improve air circulation, reduce nitrogen fertilizer rates during hot and humid weather, reduce shading, schedule irrigation so that grass blades dry quickly after irrigating). 20 _____
3. Priority: Reduced-Impact or Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for Gray Leafspot management. 5 _____
4. Turf maintenance personnel are provided with training at least annually to recognize and report Gray Leafspot problems. 10 _____
5. Bonus: Pest Manager can identify Gray Leafspot symptoms on sight. 10 _____
6. Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for Gray Leafspot. 5

_____

Total Points Available for Gray Leafspot Management
Total Points Earned for Gray Leafspot Management

60


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Section 39. Leafspot & Melting Out 
[  ] NOT APPLICABLE (Check here if Leafspot and Melting Out are not a problem requiring action at your school and proceed to the next section.) 

Points
Available

Points
Earned

1. Priority: Action thresholds for Leafspot and Melting Out are defined in the IPM Plan and effectively implemented.  20 _____
2. When Leafspot and Melting Out problems occur, contributing factors are identified and corrected (e.g., moderate nitrogen fertilizer rates, raise mowing height, diversify monocultures of perennial ryegrass). 20 _____
3. Priority: Reduced-Impact or Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for Leafspot and Melting Out management. _____
4. Turf maintenance personnel are provided with training at least annually to recognize and report Leafspot and Melting Out problems. 10 _____
5. Bonus: Pest Manager can identify Leafspot and Melting Out symptoms on sight. 10 _____
6. Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for Leafspot and Melting Out. 5

_____

Total Points Available for Leafspot and Melting Out Management
Total Points Earned for Leafspot and Melting Out Management

60


____

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Section 40. Necrotic Ring Spot/Summer Patch
[ ] NOT APPLICABLE (Check here if Necrotic Ring Spot/Summer Patch are not problems requiring action at your school and proceed to the next section.) 

Points
Available

Points
Earned

1. Priority: Action thresholds for Necrotic Ring Spot/Summer Patch are defined in the IPM Plan and effectively implemented. 20 _____
2. When Necrotic Ring Spot/Summer Patch problems occur, contributing factors are identified and corrected (e.g., avoid moisture stress; moderate fertilizer use to reduce lush, soft growth; resistant varieties are planted). 20 _____
3. Priority: Reduced-Impact or Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for Necrotic Ring Spot/Summer Patch management. 5 _____
4. Turf maintenance personnel are provided with training at least annually to recognize and report Necrotic Ring Spot/Summer Patch problems. 10 _____
5. Bonus: Pest Manager can identify Necrotic Ring Spot/Summer Patch symptoms on sight. 10 _____
6. Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for Necrotic Ring Spot/Summer Patch. 5

_____

Total Points Available for Necrotic Ring Spot/Summer Patch Mgt.
Total Points Earned for Necrotic Ring Spot/Summer Patch Mgt.t

60

_____

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Section 41. Powdery Mildew
[  ] NOT APPLICABLE (Check here if Powdery Mildew is not a problem requiring action at your school and proceed to the next section.) 

Points
Available

Points
Earned

1. Priority: Action thresholds for Powdery Mildew are defined in the IPM Plan and effectively implemented. 20 _____
2. When Powdery Mildew problems occur, contributing factors are identified and corrected (e.g., increase air circulation, plant resistant varieties or species in powdery mildew prone areas, reduce shading). 20 _____
3. Priority: Reduced-Impact or Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for Powdery Mildew pest management. 5 _____
4. Turf maintenance personnel are provided with training at least annually to recognize and report Powdery Mildew problems. 10 _____
5. Bonus: Pest Manager can identify Powdery Mildew symptoms on sight. 10 _____
6. Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for Powdery Mildew. 5

_____

Total Points Available for Powdery Mildew Management
Total Points Earned for Powdery Mildew Management

60


_____

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Section 42. Pythium
[  ] NOT APPLICABLE (Check here if Pythium is not a problem requiring action at your school and proceed to the next section.) 

Points
Available

Points
Earned

1. Priority: Action thresholds for Pythium are defined in the IPM Plan and effectively implemented. 20 _____
2. When Pythium problems occur, contributing factors are identified and corrected (e.g., improve aeration and drainage, mow only when turf is dry, reduce irrigation). 20 _____
3. Priority: Reduced-Impact or Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for Pythium pest management. 5 _____
4. Turf maintenance personnel are provided with training at least annually to recognize and report Pythium problems. 10 _____
5. Bonus: Pest Manager can identify Pythium symptoms on sight. 10 _____
6. Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for Pythium. 5

_____

Total Points Available for Pythium Management
Total Points Earned for Pythium Management

60


_____

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Section 43. Red Thread
[  ] NOT APPLICABLE (Check here if Red Thread is not a problem requiring action at your school and proceed to the next section.) 

Points
Available

Points
Earned

1. Priority: Action thresholds for Red Thread are defined in the IPM and used to guide management decisions. 20 _____
2. When Red Thread problems occur, contributing factors are identified and corrected (e.g., avoid overwatering especially during cool weather, correct nitrogen deficiencies with a quick release nitrogen fertilizer). 20 _____
3. Priority: Reduced-Impact or Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for Red Thread management. 5 _____
4. Turf maintenance personnel are provided with training at least annually to recognize and report Red Thread problems. 10 _____
5. Bonus: Pest Manager can identify Red Thread symptoms on sight. 10 _____
6. Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for Red Thread. 5

_____

Total Points Available for Red Thread Management
Total Points Earned for Red Thread Management

60


_____

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Section 44. Rhizoctonia Blight (Brown Patch)
[  ] NOT APPLICABLE (Check here if Rhizoctonia Blight is not a problem requiring action at your school and proceed to the next section.) 

Points
Available

Points
Earned

1. Priority: Action thresholds for Rhizoctonia Blight are defined in the IPM Plan. Actions are taken only when the disease has been correctly diagnosed and action thresholds are reached. 20 _____
2. When Rhizoctonia Blight problems occur, contributing factors are identified and corrected (e.g., increase aeration, improve drainage, moderate nitrogen fertilizer rates, plant resistant varieties). 20 _____
3. Priority: Reduced-Impact or Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for Rhizoctonia Blight management. 5 _____
4. Turf maintenance personnel are provided with training at least annually to recognize and report Rhizoctonia Blight problems. 10 _____
5. Bonus: Pest Manager can identify Rhizoctonia Blight symptoms on sight. 10 _____
6. Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for Rhizoctonia Blight. 5

_____

Total Points Available for Rhizoctonia Blight Management
Total Points Earned for Rhizoctonia Management

60


_____

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Section 45. Rusts
[  ] NOT APPLICABLE (Check here if rusts are not a problem requiring action at your school and proceed to the next section.) 

Points
Available

Points
Earned

1. Priority: Action thresholds for rusts are defined in the IPM Plan and effectively implemented. 20 _____
2. When rust problems occur, contributing factors are identified and corrected (e.g., restore turf vigor, schedule irrigation so that grass blades dry quickly after irrigating). 20 _____
3. Priority: Reduced-Impact or Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for rust management. 5 _____
4. Turf maintenance personnel are provided with training at least annually to recognize and report rust problems. 10 _____
5. Bonus: Pest Manager can identify rust symptoms on sight. 10 _____
6. Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for rust. 5

_____

Total Points Available for Rust Management
Total Points Earned for Rust Management

60


_____

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Section 46. Other Turf Diseases & Nematode Pests
[ ] NOT APPLICABLE (Check here if there are no other turf disease or nematode pests requiring action at your school and proceed to the next section.) 

Points
Available

Points
Earned

1. Priority: Action thresholds for these additional turf diseases or nematodes are defined in the IPM Plan and effectively implemented. 20 _____
2. When problems occur, the disease or nematode is identified correctly before taking action. Actions are appropriate for the problem. 20 _____
3. Contributing factors are identified and corrected. List here:

 

 

 

20 _____
4. Action thresholds for key turf diseases are adjusted according to the level of need, i.e. lawns can sustain higher pest levels than athletic fields during the playing season before action is justified. 10 _____
5. Priority: Reduced-Impact or Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for turf disease and nematode pest management. 5 _____
6. Bonus: Pest Manager can identify on sight symptoms of these additional disease or nematode pests of turf common to the region.List here:

 

 

 

10 _____
7. Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for turf disease and nematode pest management. 5

_____

Total Points Available for Other Turf Disease and Nematode Mgt.
Total Points Earned for Other Turf Disease and Nematode Mgt.

80

_____

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Turf Insect & Mite Pest Management
[  ] NOT APPLICABLE (Check here if turf insect and mite pests are not a problem requiring action at your school and proceed to Section 53. Vertebrate Pests)
Section 47. Billbugs
[  ] NOT APPLICABLE (Check here if billbugs are not a problem requiring action at your school and proceed to the next section.) 

Points
Available

Points
Earned

1. Priority: Action thresholds for billbugs are defined in the IPM Plan and effectively implemented. 20 _____
2. When billbug problems occur, contributing factors are identified and corrected (e.g., plant resistant varieties, reduce thatch buildup). 20 _____
3. Billbug larvae are sampled by pulling turf and examining the crown areas for larvae and frass, and/or adults are sampled using pitfall traps (i.e., place cups or cans in the ground so that the lip is at ground level. 10 _____
4. Insecticides are applied only when billbug adults are present and before substantial egg laying has occurred. If billbugs are managed effectively without insecticides, score as N/A. 10 _____
5. Priority: Reduced-Impact or Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for billbug pest management. 5 _____
6. Turf maintenance personnel are provided with training at least annually to recognize and report billbugs and damage. 10 _____
7. Bonus: Pest Manager can identify billbugs common to the region on sight (e.g., Bluegrass, Denver, Hunting, Lesser, Phoenix Billbugs). 10 _____
8. Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for billbug management. 5

_____

Total Points Available for Billbug Management
Total Points Not Applicable
Total Points Earned for Billbug Management

80

_____

_____

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Section 48. Chinch Bugs
[  ] NOT APPLICABLE (Check here if chinch bugs are not a problem requiring action at your school and proceed to the next section.) 

Points
Available

Points
Earned

1. Priority: Action thresholds for chinch bugs are defined in the IPM Plan and effectively implemented. 20 _____
2. When chinch bug problems occur, contributing factors are identified and corrected (e.g., correct compaction to improve water infiltration, increase irrigation during hot dry weather, moderate fertilizer rates and use slow release forms of nitrogen, plant resistant varieties, reduce thatch buildup). 20 _____
3. Pest Manager can distinguish chinch bugs from beneficial big-eyed bugs. 10 _____
4. Turf is monitored just before and during the hottest months of the season for chinch bugs (i.e., starting in April in Florida, late June in Wisconsin), and weekly at the start of the second generation, which is often the most damaging. 10 _____
5. Chinch bug are sampled by the flotation method (i.e., using a board, gloves or other hand protection, press a coffee can with both ends cut out two to three inches into the soil, fill with water and count the chinch bugs that float to the surface within five to ten minutes).  10 _____
6. Priority: Reduced-Impact or Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for chinch bug management. 5 _____
7. Turf maintenance personnel are provided with training at least annually to recognize and report chinch bugs and damage. 10 _____
8. Bonus: Pest Manager can identify chinch bugs common to the region on sight (e.g., Hairy, Southern Chinch Bugs). 10 _____
9. Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for chinch bug management. 5

_____

Total Points Available for Chinch Bug Management
Total Points Earned for Chinch Bug Management

90


_____

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Section 49. Mole Crickets
[  ] NOT APPLICABLE (Check here if Mole Crickets are not a problem requiring action at your school and proceed to the next section.) 

Points
Available

Points
Earned

1. Priority: Action thresholds for mole crickets are defined in the IPM Plan and effectively implemented. 20 _____
2. When mole cricket problems occur, contributing factors are identified and corrected (e.g., irrigate deeply and less frequently to encourage deep rooting, plant resistant varieties, raise mower height). 20 _____
3. Mole crickets are sampled by a soapy water drench (i.e., drench a measured area of turf with soapy water poured from a sprinkling can, and count the number of mole crickets that emerge) and/or turf is monitored in early season for adults forming calling chambers. 10 _____
4. When a pesticide is necessary, a spot application is limited to infested areas instead of treating an entire lawn or field. Treated areas are re-sampled to evaluate results and retreat if needed. If mole crickets are managed effectively without insecticides, score as N/A. 10 _____
5. Priority: Reduced-Impact or Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for mole cricket pest management. 5 _____
6. Turf maintenance personnel are provided with training at least annually to recognize and report mole crickets and damage. 10 _____
7. Bonus: Pest Manager can identify mole crickets common to the region on sight (e.g., Northern, Short-Winged, Southern, Tawny Mole Crickets). 10 _____
8. Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for mole cricket management. 5

_____

Total Points Available for Mole Cricket Management
Total Points Not Applicable
Total Points Earned for Mole Cricket Management

80

_____

_____

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Section 50. Turf-Feeding Caterpillars: Armyworms, Cutworms, Sod Webworms
[  ] NOT APPLICABLE (Check here if turf-feeding caterpillars are not a problem requiring action at your school and proceed to the next section.) 

Points
Available

Points
Earned

1. Priority: Action thresholds for problem turf-feeding caterpillars are defined in the IPM Plan and effectively implemented. 20 _____
2. When problems occur, the caterpillar is identified correctly before taking action. Actions are appropriate for the problem caterpillar. 20 _____
3. When turf-feeding caterpillars problems occur, contributing factors are identified and corrected (e.g., correct problem drainage areas, moderate fertilizer rates and use slow release forms of nitrogen, reduce thatch buildup). 20 _____
4. Action thresholds are based on numbers of feeding caterpillars. 10 _____
5. Pesticides, if used, are applied only when feeding caterpillars are present. If caterpillars are effectively managed without pesticides, score as N/A. 10 _____
6. Turf-feeding caterpillars are sampled by a soapy water drench (i.e., drenching a measured area of turf with soapy water poured from a sprinkling can, and counting the number of turf-feeding caterpillars that emerge), and/or pheromone or blacklight traps for adults. 10 _____
7. When a pesticide is necessary, a spot application is limited to infested areas instead of treating an entire lawn or field. If caterpillars are effectively managed without pesticides, score as N/A. 10 _____
8. Priority: Reduced-Impact or Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for turf-feeding caterpillar pest management. 5 _____
9. Turf maintenance personnel are provided with training at least annually to recognize and report turf-feeding caterpillars and damage. 10 _____
10. Bonus: Pest Manager can identify turf-feeding caterpillars common to the region on sight (e.g., armyworms, cutworms, Sod Webworms). 10 _____
11. Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for turf-feeding caterpillar management. 5 _____

Total Points Available for Turf-Feeding Caterpillar Management
Total Points Not Applicable
Total Points Earned for Turf-Feeding Caterpillar Management

120

_____
 

_____

Back to Part II. IPM Standards for School Grounds – Contents

Section 51. White Grubs
[  ] NOT APPLICABLE (Check here if white grubs are not a problem requiring action at your school and proceed to the next section.) 

Points
Available

Points
Earned

1. Priority: Action thresholds for problem white grubs are defined in the IPM Plan and effectively implemented. 20 _____
2. When problems occur, the white grub is identified correctly before taking action. Actions are appropriate for the problem grub. 20 _____
3. When white grub problems occur, factors contributing to the problem are identified and corrected (e.g., correct compaction to improve water infiltration, correct problem drainage areas). 20 _____
4. White grubs are sampled by extracting a turf core with a bulb planter, golf course cup cutter, or by cutting and peeling back a square of turf, and counting the number of white grubs present; and/or pheromone or blacklight trapping of adult beetles. 10 _____
5. Action thresholds for grubs are appropriate to the problem species, i.e., turf can withstand much higher number of Black Turfgrass Ataenius beetles (30 to 50 per sq. ft.) than European Chafers (0.5 to 7 per sq. ft.) before action is required. 10 _____
6. Insecticides, if used for grubs, are applied when grubs are small (e.g., fall for Japanese Beetle, Green June Bug). Insecticide treatments are not made after grubs have stopped feeding. If grubs are managed effectively without insecticides, score as N/A. 10 _____
7. Action thresholds for grubs are appropriate to the pest management unit, i.e. actions are taken on high-profile lawns at a lower threshold than less visible or infrequently used lawn areas. 10 _____
8. When a pesticide is necessary, a spot application is limited to infested areas instead of treating an entire lawn or field. If grubs are managed effectively without insecticides, score as N/A. 10 _____
9. Priority: Reduced-Impact or Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for white grub management. 5 _____
10. Turf maintenance personnel are provided with training at least annually to recognize and report white grubs and white grub damage. 10 _____
11. Bonus: Pest Manager can identify white grubs common to the region on sight (e.g., Asiatic Garden Beetle, Black Turfgrass Ataenius, Green June Beetle, Japanese Beetle, Masked Chafer, May/June beetles, Oriental Beetle). 10 _____
12. Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for white grubs. 5

_____

Total Points Available for White Grub Management
Total Points Not Applicable
Total Points Earned for White Grub Management

80

_____

_____

Back to Part II. IPM Standards for School Grounds – Contents

Section 52. Other Turf Insect & Mite Pests
[  ] NOT APPLICABLE (Check here if there are no other turf insect or mite pest problems requiring action at your school and proceed to the next section.) 

Points
Available

Points
Earned

1. Priority: Action thresholds for these additional turf insect or mite pests are defined in the IPM Plan and effectively implemented. 20 _____
2. When problems occur, the pest is identified correctly before taking action. Actions are appropriate for the problem pest. 20 _____
3. Contributing factors are identified and corrected. List here:

 

20 _____
4. Action thresholds for key turf insect and mite pests are adjusted according to the level of need, i.e. lawns can sustain higher pest levels than athletic fields during the playing season. 10 _____
5. Priority: Reduced-Impact or Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for turf insect and mite management. 5 _____
6. Bonus: Pest Manager can identify these additional turf insect and mite pests on sight. List here:

 

10 _____
7. Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for turf insect and mite management. 5

_____

Total Points Available for Other Turf Insect or Mite Pest Management
Total Points Earned for Other Turf Insect or Mite Pest Management

80

_____

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Section 53. Vertebrate Pests: Coyotes, Deer, Feral Cats and Dogs, Gophers, Moles, Rabbits, Raccoons, Rodents, Skunks, Snakes, Woodchucks, etc.
[  ] NOT APPLICABLE (Check here if vertebrates are not a problem requiring action at your school and proceed to the next section.) 

Points
Available

Points
Earned

1. Priority: Persons handling vertebrate traps or bait stations, or inspecting suspected harborages (e.g., crawl spaces, attics) are trained in public health risks and proper hygiene, and wear appropriate protective gear. Traps, bait stations or other surfaces contaminated with urine or feces are properly disinfected or disposed of. 20 _____
2. Priority: Pest Manager is aware of and understands Federal, state and local laws pertaining to vertebrate pest management and protected/endangered vertebrate species. 20 _____
3. Priority: Action thresholds for key vertebrate pests are defined in the IPM Plan and effectively implemented. 20 _____
4. When problems occur with vertebrate pests, contributing factors are identified and corrected (e.g., denying access to food, water or shelter by exclusion, sanitation, replacing vertebrate pest-prone plants, etc.). 20 _____
5. Legible records are maintained of when key vertebrate pests appear and relative abundance and impacts from one year to the next. This information is used to evaluate and adjust weed management strategies. 10 _____
6. Pesticides (e.g., toxic baits) are used only when action thresholds are exceeded, and only by personnel fully trained in bait selection (coagulant vs. anticoagulants, blocks vs. pellets vs. grain-based, tracking powders, etc.). If vertebrate pests are managed effectively without pesticides, score as N/A. 10 _____
7. A communications program is in place to school staff and students about their role in preventing and reporting vertebrate pest problems. 10 _____
8. Priority: Snap traps, if used for vertebrate pests, are placed only in areas not accessible to children (e.g., in locked outbuildings, inaccessible animal dens or tamper-proof containers securely attached to the ground so that the container cannot be picked up or moved). If vertebrate pests are managed effectively without snap traps, score as N/A. 20 _____
9. Inspections for vertebrate pests include examining school grounds for food sources (e.g., edible plants, fallen fruit and nuts), animal feces, nests, etc. If signs of vertebrate feeding or activity are found, conditions favoring pests are corrected (e.g., modify stretches of dense vegetation or tall ground cover that allow vertebrate pests to travel long distance under cover). 10 _____
10. Priority: Reduced-Impact or Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for vertebrate pest management. 5 _____
11. Bonus: Teachers incorporate IPM for vertebrate pests into curricula and/or class projects. 10 _____
12. Bonus: Pest Manager can identify vertebrate pests common to the region on sight. 10 _____
13. Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for vertebrate pest management. 5 _____

Total Points Available for Vertebrate Pest Management
Total Points Not Applicable
Total Points Earned for Vertebrate Pest Management

150

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Section 54. Weeds

Points
Available

Points
Earned

1. Priority: Action thresholds for key weed pests are defined in the IPM Plan and effectively implemented. 20 _____
2. Rough weed maps or diaries are prepared at least annually for areas where weeds are growing, noting which weeds are present and where.* 20 _____
3. When weed problems occur, contributing factors are identified and corrected (e.g., compaction, low nutrient levels, improper plant placement). 20 _____
4. Legible records are maintained of when key weed pests appear, relative abundance and impacts (e.g., control costs, complaints, etc.) from one year to the next. This information is used to evaluate and adjust weed management strategies. 10 _____
5. Where appropriate, spot treatments are made rather than area-wide treatments (e.g., a wick-type herbicide applicator is used to apply a small amount of herbicide on individual weeds or patches of weeds). If weeds are managed without herbicides, score as N/A. 10 _____
6. Herbicides are applied when students are not present (e.g., after the school day, weekends, school breaks). If weeds are managed without herbicides, score as N/A. 10 _____
7. Priority: Reduced-Impact or Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for weed management. 5 _____
8. Bonus: Herbicides are not applied for weeds that are aesthetic problems only. 10 _____
9. Bonus: Pest Manager can identify problem weeds common to the region on sight, including those designated as noxious weeds or protected plants by federal, state or local laws. 10 _____
10. Bonus: Pest Manager knows the requirements for growth and methods of reproduction for key weed pests. 5 _____
11. Least-Impact Options are the only methods used for weed management. 5 _____

Total Points Available for Weed Management
Total Points Not Applicable
Total Points Earned for Weed Management

100

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Back to Part II. IPM Standards for School Grounds – Contents